No Bono No Problem– Jimmy Fallon and The Roots Cover for the Injured Star

U2 was supposed to do a week long residency at the Tonight Show this week, but because Bono is having the world’s worst luck streak, they had to postpone. Last night, Jimmy Fallon took the stage as the unluckiest man in the world Bono by slapping on the hat and glasses, and joining The Roots for a performance of U2’s hit 1988 track, “Desire.”

If you have been living under a rock, Bono’s bad luck started when his plane door fell off mid-flight and just the other day, he had a bike accident in Central Park that will require surgery.

Check it out Jimmy and The Roots below.

 

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This Day in Music History — October 29

1983 : Pink Floyd’s Dark Side Of The Moon album breaks the record for most weeks on the Billboard album charts when it eclipses Johnny’s Greatest Hits by Johnny Mathis with 491 weeks. Dark Side would stay a total of 741 weeks.

1993 : Tim Burton’s animated musical The Nightmare Before Christmas hits US theaters. The film features music composed by Danny Elfman of Oingo Boingo; Elfman also sings the vocal parts of protagonist Jack Skellington.

2005 : The wax figures of the younger Beatles used in the cover of the band’s Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album are auctioned off for 81,500 pounds in London after being discovered languishing in the backroom of Madame Tussauds’ famous wax museum.

2009 : To celebrate the 25th anniversary of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, a series of concerts take place at Madison Square Garden, featuring inductees like Bruce Springsteen, Bono, Mick Jagger and Aretha Franklin.

The best mass musician sing-a-longs EVER

from Hello Giggles

by Sophia Elias

Before Tuesday night, mass musician sing-a-longs were few and far between. Thankfully, BBC Music pulled out all the stops with their star-studded cover of the Beach Boys 1996 hit, “God Only Knows”. In light of the BBC Music launch, the network got everyone (and by everyone, I mean 29 world class musicians) to participate in the promo. With the likes of Elton John, Florence Welch, Pharrell, Lorde, Chris Martin, Dave Grohl and Sam Smith, it certainly didn’t disappoint.

Much like its all-star predecessors, “God Only Knows” will contribute to a good cause. The song is set to be released as a single in order to raise money for the BBC’s Children in Need appeal. I have to say, I haven’t been one to seek out celebrity sing-a-longs, but there is something powerful about world class artists collaborating on a single project. I think we ought take a trip down memory lane and give a nod to all those great musical collabs from the past. There are more than you probably know:

1. We Are The World (1985)

“We Are The World” is the mother of all mass musician sing-a-longs. Written by Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie, “We Are The World” was released in an effort to raise awareness and bring relief to the famine in Africa between 1983-1985. The song raised over $10 million in record sales from the United States alone. The song included performances from over 44 world class musicians—including Cyndi Lauper, Billy Joel, Bruce Springsteen and Ray Charles—who operated under the name of USA for Africa. Fun fact: When the musicians entered the studio, they were met with a sign that read: “Check your egos at the door.” Continue reading

This Day in Music History — October 9

1940 : John Winston Lennon is born in Liverpool, England. The “Winston” comes from British Prime Minister Winston Churchill – John would later add “Ono” to his middle name in honor of Yoko.

1962 : The BBC refuses to play the Bobby “Boris” Pickett Halloween hit Monster Mash on grounds that it is too morbid and tasteless.

1964 : The Rolling Stones cancel an upcoming South African tour when the British Musicians Union declares an embargo of the country due to their apartheid polices.

2001 : U2 frontman Bono, R.E.M. singer Michael Stipe, and electronica maven Moby make unannounced appearances in New York, at the second of two anti-violence benefit concerts organized by the Beastie Boys.

Exclusive: Bono Reveals Secrets of U2’s Surprise Album ‘Songs of Innocence’

In his only pre-release interview, Bono takes us inside the story of the band’s 13th album, which was released today for free on iTunes

Bono and The Edge of U2 in 2011
Kevin Mazur/Getty Images
Bono and the Edge onstage in 2011. The pair helped announce U2’s surprise album ‘Songs of Innocence’ at Apple’s press event in Cupertino.
BY | September 9, 2014

U2 surprised the world today by releasing Songs of Innocence, their first album in five years, as a gift from Apple, available for free immediately to anyone with iTunes. The band made the announcement with Apple CEO Tim Cook at a Cupertino press conference for the new iPhone 6, capping the event with a performance of the album’s first single, “The Miracle (of Joey Ramone).” After a standing ovation, Cook said, “Wasn’t that the most incredible single you ever heard? We would love a whole album of that.”

“The question is now, how do we get it to as many people as possible, because that’s what our band is all about,” Bono said. “I do believe you have over half a billion subscribers to iTunes, so — could you get this to them?” “If we gave it away for free,” Cook replied. And five seconds later, the album was unleashed in the largest album release of all time.

“We wanted to make a very personal album,” Bono told Rolling Stone‘s Gus Wenner the day before the press conference in an exclusive interview. “Let’s try to figure out why we wanted to be in a band, the relationships around the band, our friendships, our lovers, our family. The whole album is first journeys — first journeys geographically, spiritually, sexually. And that’s hard. But we went there.”

The band worked on Innocence for two years with producer Danger Mouse (a.k.a. Brian Burton), then brought in additional help: Flood, their collaborator since 1987’s The Joshua Tree, plus Adele producers Paul Epworth and Ryan Tedder. “I think having them around really helped,” says Bono, Some of the music out there now that people call pop, it’s not pop – it’s just truly great. And we wanted to have the discipline of the Beatles or the Stones in the Sixties, when you had real songs. There’s nowhere to hide in them: clear thoughts, clear melodies.”

To begin, the band went back to its roots: Bono says the group listened to the music they loved in the Seventies, from punk rock to Bowie, glam rock, early electronica and Joy Division. The album kicks off with “The Miracle (of Joey Ramone),” a loping pop song laced with distinctly punk-ish power chords. “I found my voice through Joey Ramone,” says Bono, “because I wasn’t the obvious punk-rock singer, or even rock singer. I sang like a girl — which I’m into now, but when I was 17 or 18, I wasn’t sure. And I heard Joey Ramone, who sang like a girl, and that was my way in.”

The driving, reggae-tinged “This Is Where You Can Reach Me Now,” is a tribute to the Clash, with slinky guitars from the Edge that nod to Sandinista!. “After we saw the Clash, it was a sort of blueprint for U2,” says Bono. “We knew we couldn’t possibly hope to be as cool, and that’s proven to be true, but we did think we could get behind a sort of social justice agenda.”

There is also an intensely personal song about Bono’s mother, Iris Hewson, who died when he was 14. “Forty years ago, my mother fell at her own father’s funeral, and I never spoke with her again,” he says. “Rage always follows grief, and I had a lot of it, and I still have, but I channeled it into music and I still do. I have very few memories of my mother, and I put a few of them in a song called ‘Iris.'”

The most joyous track on Songs of Innocence is “California (There Is No End to Love),” which unexpectedly nods to the Beach Boys in its intro. “It’s like the sun itself,” says Bono. “It’s about our first trip to Los Angeles.” The darkest track, meanwhile, is “Raised by Wolves,” which tells of a deadly car bombing in Dublin. “It was a real incident that happened in our country where three car bombs were set to go off at the same time in Dublin on a Friday night, 5:30,” says Bono, “On any other Friday I would have been at this record shop, just down the corner, but I cycled to school that day.”

At times Songs of Innocence feels almost like a concept album about Bono’s early years – there’s even a track named after the street where the singer grew up, “Cedarwood Road.” “It has a lyrical cohesion that I think is unique amongst U2 albums,” says Bono, “I don’t want it to be a concept album, but the songs come from a place. Edge laughed and said this is our Quadrophenia. We could be so lucky.”

#TBT Number on Songs on This Day

1955- Bill Haley and His Comets – Rock Around The Clock

1964- Beatles – A Hard Day’s Night

1975- Bee Gees – Jive Talkin’

1981- Rick Springfield – Jessie’s Girl

1983- Police – Every Breath You Take

1985- Tears for Fears – Shout

1987- U2 – I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For

1991- Bryan Adams – (Everything I Do) I Do It for You

1994- Lisa Loeb – Stay (I Missed You)

1995- TLC – Waterfalls

1999- Christina Aguilera – Genie In A Bottle

2001- Destiny’s Child – Bootylicious

2008- Katy Perry – I Kissed a Girl

2010- Eminem feat. Rihanna – Love the Way You Lie