Rolling Stone’s 100 Greatest Songwriters 50-41

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See Part 1Part 2,Part 3Part 4 and Part 5

50- Billy Joel

From a town known as Oyster Bay, Long Island, rode a boy with a six-pack in his hand — Billy Joel, in real life a piano man from Hicksville. Joel started out playing in rock & roll bands before returning to the piano at the beginning of the Seventies. “After seven years of trying to make it as a rock star, I decided to do what I always wanted to do — write about my own experiences,” he said in 1971, around the time of his debut album, Cold Spring Harbor. Joel has always had a heart in Tin Pan Alley, first hitting it big in the Seventies with the semi-confessional tale of wasting away as a lounge performer, “Piano Man.” But he’s applied his old-school craft to a host of rock styles, scoring hits as a blue-collar balladeer (“She’s Always a Woman”) or a doo-wop soul man (“The Longest Time”), trying out jazzy Scorcese-like streetlife serenades (“Zanzibar,” “Stiletto”). His signature song, “Scenes from an Italian Restaurant,” is an epic seven-minute tale of suburban dreams biting the dust down at the Parkway Diner. Happy 50th anniversary, Brenda and Eddie.

49- Don Henley and Glenn Frey

The two future Eagles were lucky to meet up in L.A. in the early Seventies, but in their hunger for success, they were even more fortunate to have formidable competition. “In the beginning, we were the underdogs,” Frey once said. “Being in close proximity to Jackson Browne, Joni Mitchell, and Crosby, Stills and Nash, this unspoken thing was created between Henley and me, which said, ‘If we want to be up here with the big boys, we’d better write some fucking good songs.'” They proceeded to do just that: Whether composing together (“Desperado,” “One of These Nights,” “Tequila Sunrise,” “Lyin’ Eyes”) or with other band members (“Hotel California,” “Life in the Fast Lane,” “New Kid in Town”), Henley and Frey knew that songs — and fastidiously produced recordings of them— would be the key to their success far more so than their harmonies or lack of flashy showmanship. And those songs, soaked in world-weariness, cynicism, resentment and the occasional happy ending, were so precisely crafted that, decades later, they keep people returning to the records and seeing the band’s seemingly endless reunion tour.

48- Elton John and Bernie Taupin

In 1967, a clever record company executive paired lyricist Bernie Taupin and a young piano player named Reginald Kenneth Dwight. Their partnership has endured for nearly 50 years, putting 57 songs in the Top 40. “Without [Bernie] the journey would not have been possible,” Elton said in 1994. “I let all my expressions and my love and my pain and my anger come out with my melodies. I had someone to write my words for me. Without him, the journey would not have been possible.” Their process has remained nearly identical from day one: Bernie writes a lyric and sends it to Elton, who sits down at a piano and turns it into a song. They first hit it big in the Seventies with “Your Song,” a tune that Taupin now calls “one of the most naïve and childish lyrics in the entire repertoire of music.” But it quickly lead to more advanced work like “Madman Across the Water,” “Levon” and “Sorry Seems to Be the Hardest Word,” along with goofy fun tunes like “Bennie and the Jets” and “Crocodile Rock.” “Andy Warhol never explained what his paintings were about,” Taupin said said in 2013. “He’d just say, ‘What does it mean to you?’ That’s how I feel about songs.”

47- Neil Diamond

There’s a reason Diamond’s songs have been covered by everyone from the Monkees and Smash Mouth to Sinatra. First are the meaty, hooky melodies, dating back to early Diamond sing-alongs like “Cherry, Cherry” and “Sweet Caroline” and extending into later, more brooding angst-a-thons like “I Am. . .I Said” and “Song Sung Blue.” The all-ages appeal of his music also has to do with the way Diamond has sketched out his life — and the lives of many of his fans. From his early, frisky Brill Building pop (“I’m a Believer”) to the later-life love songs about his latest wife, few singers brood and contemplate life in song the way Diamond has. And let’s not forget the ebullient “Cracklin’ Rosie,” the vaguely salacious “Girl, You’ll Be a Woman Soon,” just two of the more than 50 songs he’s placed in the Billboard Top 100 during his half-century-plus career. “I’m motivated to find myself,” he told Rolling Stone in 1976. “I do it in a very silly way. I write these little songs and go and sing them. . .It seems like an odd way to gain an inner sense of acceptance of the self. But it’s what I do.”

46- Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong

Barrett Strong sang Motown’s first big hit, 1959’s “Money (That’s What I Want),” but found an even greater success as a lyricist. For a six-year stretch beginning with 1967’s “I Heard It Through the Grapevine,” he and composer/producer Norman Whitfield were a mighty songwriting team at Motown. Working most famously with the Temptations, they created “psychedelic soul,” built on Whitfield’s expansively experimental production and Strong’s downbeat, socially conscious lyrics. As far away from pop convention as Whitfield and Strong’s music could be — several of the artists they worked with grew frustrated with their freakiness — their sound found its audience: the Temptations’ “Ball of Confusion,” the Undisputed Truth’s “Smiling Faces Sometimes” and Edwin Starr’s vehement protest diatribe “War” were all huge hits. “Norman Whitfield was the visionary,” Motown guitarist Dennis Coffey recalled. “He was always building up layers, making breakdowns, creating this searing funk with amazing dynamic changes.”

45- Robbie Robertson

At a time when many rock songwriters were interested in psychedelic escapism, the Band’s Robbie Robertson looked for inspiration in America — its history, its myths and its music. Songs like “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” “Up on Cripple Creek,” “The Weight” and “King Harvest (Has Surely Come)” were, as Greil Marcus wrote in Mystery Train, “committed to the very idea of America: complicated, dangerous and alive.” Robinson’s songwriting grounded the Band, influencing generations of back-to-the-land rockers. Yet, he was content to play a kind of behind-the-scenes role, passing out songs for the Band’s three distinct vocalists — Levon Helm, Rick Danko and Richard Manuel — in an act of generosity that enhanced the Band’s theme of communal progress and spirit. “I had almost like a theater workshop,” he said, “where you’re casting people in these parts, and that’s what my job was then.” Since the Band ended its run, Robinson has only released albums sporadically; his most recent, 2013’s How to Become Clairvoyant, delivered vintage American idioms with a 21st Century feel.

44- Jimmy Webb

“[Songwriting] is hell on Earth,” Jimmy Webb wrote in his book, Tunesmith. “If it isn’t, then you’re doing it wrong.” Born in Oklahoma in 1946, Webb is an heir to the Great American Songbook. Sixties hits like “Up, Up and Away,” “By the Time I Get to Phoenix,” and “Wichita Lineman” marked him as an MOR master, a pigeonhole that irked him no end: According to Linda Ronstadt, Webb “was shunned and castigated for what was perceived as his lack of hipness.” While he’s recognized today for his unique explorations themes of loneliness and individuality in the American landscape, his most popular song remains an abiding enigma. “I don’t think it’s a very good song,” he said of “MacArthur Park,” the much-covered 1968 hit he penned for singer Richard Harris. “But the American people appear to have developed an incredible fascination with the one image of the cake out in the rain.”

43- Johnny Cash

His voice had the authority of experience, and so did his songs. In them, he was the man who taught the weeping willow how to cry, the solitary figure who wore black for the poor and beaten-down, the stone-cold killer who boasted he’d “shot a man in Reno just to watch him die.” At Sun Records and later at Columbia — in songs like “I Walk the Line,” “Folsom Prison Blues,” “Big River,” “Five Feet High and Rising” and “I Still Miss Someone” — he married the language of country, blues and gospel to the emerging snap of rock & roll. He recognized emerging talent, recording Dylan’s “It Ain’t Me Babe” and Kris Kristofferson’s “Sunday Morning Coming Down,” and one of his signature songs was written by his future wife, June Carter, about their emerging love. And he never stopped, recording “The Wanderer” with U2 in 1993, and a series of albums with Rick Rubin in his final years as he battled the effects of Shy-Dragger Syndrome. “Blessed with a profound imagination, he used the gift to express all the various lost causes of the human soul,” Dylan wrote after Cash’s death in 2003. “This is a miraculous and humbling thing. Listen to him, and he always brings you to your senses.”

42- Sly Stone

“My only weapon is my pen/And the frame of mind I’m in,” Sly Stone muttered on “Poet,” his clearest public statement on the art of songwriting. In his late-Sixties/early-Seventies prime, it was a potent combination: composer/producer David Axelrod called him “the greatest talent in pop music history.” Born Sylvester Stewart, Sly was a DJ and record producer with an equal love for soul music ands the Beatles. When he convened Sly and the Family Stone in the late Sixties, he deployed a fast-talking radio jock’s ear for aphorism (“different strokes for different folks,” “I want to take you higher”) and an ability to make tricky arrangements seem natural (“Thank You Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin” builds raw funk out of everyone in the band playing radically different parts). From the optimism of “Everyday People” to the funky angst of 1971’s There’s a Riot Goin’ On, his music mapped the flower-power era’s journey from utopian promise to catastrophic meltdown as well as anyone, and his grooves and riffs have been endlessly sampled by the hip-hop artists to arrive in his wake. “I have no doubt about my music,” Sly said in 1970. “The truth sustains.”

41- Max Martin

Every pop era has at least one songwriter who effortlessly taps into the zeitgeist, and for the last roughly 15 years, that person has been this Swedish writer-producer. Starting in the Nineties with the Backstreet Boy’s “I Want It That Way” and Britney Spears’ “…Baby One More Time,” among others, Martin helped create the whooshing, hyper-energized sound of modern pop — a talent that has extended to a mind-boggling list of recent collaborations that include Taylor Swift’s “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together,” Katy Perry’s “Last Friday Night” and “Teenage Dream,” Ariana Grande’s “Problem,” Kelly Clarkson’s “Since U Been Gone” and Adam Lambert’s “Whataya Want from Me.” “I try to make the songs as good as I can — the way I like it, you know?” Martin has said. “And I guess my taste sometimes happens to be what other people, particularly radio programmers, like, too. As you know, a lot of the stuff that was once considered rubbish or ‘for kids’ is now considered classic.”

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New Orleans Jazz Fest reveals 2015 lineup

 

The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival has revealed its 2015 lineup. Elton John, The Who, Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga, and No Doubt are among this year’s headlining acts. They’ll be joined by other notable artists including Wilco, Ryan Adams, Widespread Panic, Buddy Guy, Jimmy Cliff, and Steve Winwood.

Also playing at the festival are John Legend, Jimmy Buffett, Hozier, Trombone Shorty, Dr. John, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Alison Krauss & Union Station, Kacey Musgraves, Aaron Neville, Ivan Neville’s Dumpstaphunk, Kermit Ruffins, The Blind Boys of Alabama, Jimmy Vaughn, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Galactic featuring Macy Gray, Allen Toussaint, Irma Thomas, The Meters featuring Art Neville, Leo Nocentelli, George Porter Jr., and Joseph “Zigaboo” Modeliste, Chicago, Ed Sheeran, Jerry Lee Lewis, The O’Jays, Estelle, Irvin Mayfield, The Word, Anders Osborne, and Shovels & Rope.

Jazz Fest takes place over the course of two weekends (April 24th – 26th and April 30th – May 3rd) at New Orleans’ City Park. Tickets to both weekends are available beginning Tuesday, January 13th through the festival’s website.

Originally Posted on Consequence of Sound

This Day in Music History — December 21

1968 : Janis Joplin makes her solo concert debut in Memphis at an event for the Stax/Volt record label. The Stax house band Booker T. & The MG’s also plays.

1970 : Elvis Presley meets President Nixon in the Oval Office at the White House, where the iconic picture of the two shaking hands is taken.

1991 : Bohemian Rhapsody goes back to #1 on the UK charts after the death of Freddie Mercury, and stays there for five weeks. In America, the song would get new life the next year when it was used in the movie Wayne’s World.

1996 : En route to a White House dinner with the Clintons, Tony Bennett suffers a ruptured hernia and is rushed to the hospital.

2005 : Elton John and his partner David Furnish take part in a civil ceremony (gay marriage was not legal in England) to make their union official. Guests at the ceremony, which takes place in Windsor, England, include George Michael, Sharon Stone, and Ozzy and Sharon Osbourne.

This Day in Music History — November 26

1954 : On tour, Elvis Presley sends a telegram to his parents: “Hi babies, here’s the money to pay the bills, don’t tell no one how much I sent I will send more next week. There is a card in the mail. Love Elvis.”

1989 : MTV’s Unplugged series premieres with an episode featuring Squeeze. Jules Shear hosted the first season.

2001 : At the Queen’s Royal Command Performance in London, Elton John, Cher and Donny Osmond perform.

2002 : Actor and major Elvis fan Nicolas Cage divorces Lisa Marie Presley after less than four months, citing “irreconcilable differences.”

2011 : Sugarland’s lead vocalist, Jennifer Nettles, marries her boyfriend of two years, Justin Miller, at a chapel in the foothills of Tennessee’s Smoky Mountains.

This Day in Music History — November 24

1961 : In yet another important development for British blues-rock, Chicago blues legend Howlin’ Wolf makes his first appearance in the UK for his first European tour, touring behind his latest single, “Little Baby.”

1974 : In the midst of his infamous “Lost Weekend,” John Lennon rehearses with Elton John for Elton’s upcoming Madison Square Garden performance, at which Lennon will make a surprise cameo.

1991 : Cyndi Lauper marries the actor David Thornton. Little Richard, who is an ordained minister, presides over the ceremony and performs at the reception.

1997 : On today’s episode of Judge Judy, Johnny Rotten of The Sex Pistols is the defendant in a wrongful termination lawsuit brought on by his former drummer. Judy Rules in Rotten’s favor, and thanks him for his patience.

2003 : Glen Campbell is arrested for drunk driving and hit-and-run charges in Phoenix, AZ, after crashing his BMW into another car at another intersection and continuing on. The 67-year-old Campbell, who is sentenced to ten days in jail, allegedly knees an officer’s groin during the arrest.

The Art of McCartney

Due Nov. 18, the Paul McCartney tribute album ‘The Art of McCartney’ collects more than 40 covers of songs originally recorded by the former Beatle.

The box set has covers from nearly 40 artists including Bruce Springsteen, Elton John, Phil Collins, Chris Martin, Nick Cave, Dave Grohl, Florence Welch, Paul Weller and Ozzy Osbourne. Listen to a few of the cuts below.

The set, available for pre-order now, will be offered in a variety of configurations, including a deluxe box, triple-gatefold vinyl, CD and digital.

This Day in Music History — October 30

1967 : Brian Jones (The Rolling Stones) pleads guilty to drug possession and gets a nine month prison sentence.

1972 : Elton John becomes the second rock star to play a Command Performance for Britain’s royalty, nine years after The Beatles became the first.

1999 : It’s an early attempt at video over the web, as Neil Young’s annual Bridge School Benefit concert is “cybercast” to a few brave souls trying to get their modems to work. The Who, Pearl Jam, and Brian Wilson perform at the show.

2007 : Singer/actor Robert Goulet dies while awaiting a lung transplant in Los Angeles, California, at age 73. He had been diagnosed with the rare, progressive disease idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

 

This Day in Music History — October 20

1950 : Tom Petty is born in Gainesville, Florida. Formed The Heartbreakers in Los Angeles, California. Member of The Traveling Wilburys.

1969 : John Lennon and Yoko Ono release their Wedding Album LP (with a photo of their own wedding cake and a copy of their marriage certificate included.)

1977 : Lynyrd Skynyrd members Ronnie Van Zant and Steve Gaines die in a plane crash in Mississippi. Gaines’ sister, Cassie, who was a backup singer with the group, is also killed along with 2 pilots and the band’s manager. Other members of the group are badly injured.

1999 : A year after nearly dying from pneumonia, Johnny Cash finds himself battling the condition again. Cash is listed in serious condition at Baptist Hospital in Nashville.

2001 : Raising money for victims of the September 11th attacks, Paul McCartney leads “The Concert For New York” in Madison Square Garden. Elton John, Billy Joel, David Bowie, The Who, and Eric Clapton all participate

The best mass musician sing-a-longs EVER

from Hello Giggles

by Sophia Elias

Before Tuesday night, mass musician sing-a-longs were few and far between. Thankfully, BBC Music pulled out all the stops with their star-studded cover of the Beach Boys 1996 hit, “God Only Knows”. In light of the BBC Music launch, the network got everyone (and by everyone, I mean 29 world class musicians) to participate in the promo. With the likes of Elton John, Florence Welch, Pharrell, Lorde, Chris Martin, Dave Grohl and Sam Smith, it certainly didn’t disappoint.

Much like its all-star predecessors, “God Only Knows” will contribute to a good cause. The song is set to be released as a single in order to raise money for the BBC’s Children in Need appeal. I have to say, I haven’t been one to seek out celebrity sing-a-longs, but there is something powerful about world class artists collaborating on a single project. I think we ought take a trip down memory lane and give a nod to all those great musical collabs from the past. There are more than you probably know:

1. We Are The World (1985)

“We Are The World” is the mother of all mass musician sing-a-longs. Written by Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie, “We Are The World” was released in an effort to raise awareness and bring relief to the famine in Africa between 1983-1985. The song raised over $10 million in record sales from the United States alone. The song included performances from over 44 world class musicians—including Cyndi Lauper, Billy Joel, Bruce Springsteen and Ray Charles—who operated under the name of USA for Africa. Fun fact: When the musicians entered the studio, they were met with a sign that read: “Check your egos at the door.” Continue reading

This Day in Music History — September 27

1964 : The Beach Boys make their national television debut on CBS’ Ed Sullivan Show, performing their recent hit I Get Around.

1979 : While onstage at the Universal Amphitheater in Los Angeles, CA, Elton John collapses from “exhaustion.” The song he’d been performing, ominously, was entitled Better Off Dead.

1990 : Marvin Gaye receives a posthumous star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1500 Vine Street.

2004 : Legendary rock producer Phil Spector, best known for creating the “Wall Of Sound” on hits like The Ronettes’ Be My Baby and The Righteous Brothers’ You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’, is indicted for the February 2003 murder of actress Lana Clarkson at his estate in Alhambra, California.