This Day in Music History — December 25

1954 : Annie Lennox is born in Aberdeen, Scotland.

1959 : An apprentice engineer from Liverpool named Richard Starkey, then already eighteen, gets his first real set of drums for Christmas (the young Starkey’s family couldn’t afford a proper set when he was a child). Later, he would become known as Ringo Starr.

1981 : Michael Jackson calls Paul McCartney to wish him Merry Christmas and suggests they write and record together. The result is the hit duet “The Girl Is Mine,” the first single off of the landmark album Thriller.

1982 : David Bowie and Bing Crosby’s “The Little Drummer Boy/Peace On Earth,” an unlikely duet broadcast five years earlier on Crosby’s Merrie Olde Christmas TV special, becomes an even more unlikely hit, reaching #1 in the UK.

1994 : Green Day play Madison Square Garden in New York City. It’s quite a leap for the band, which had been playing small clubs at the beginning of the year. During the show, lead singer Billie Joe Armstrong performs wearing only socks and a strategically placed guitar.

1995 : Dean Martin, also suffering from lung cancer, dies from acute respiratory failure due to emphysema at age 78. Las Vegas honors the legend by dimming the lights along the city’s famous Strip.

2008 : Eartha Kitt dies of colon cancer in Weston, Connecticut, at age 81.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Class of 2015

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has announced its Class of 2015. According to Rolling Stone, Green Day, Lou Reed, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Bill Withers, and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band will be inducted during a ceremony held next April.

Ringo Starr will be given the Award For Musical Excellence. Starr was previously inducted as a member of The Beatles in 1988, though his three other bandmates have since entered the Hall of Fame as solo artists.

Nine Inch Nails, The Smiths, Kraftwerk, N.W.A., Chic, and Sting were among the final nominees who didn’t to make the cut. Better luck next year!

The induction ceremony will take place on April 18th at Cleveland’s Public House and broadcast on HBO in May.

This Day in Music History — October 8

1980 : During his performance at Pittsburgh’s Stanley Theater, Bob Marley collapses on stage and is rushed to New York’s Sloan-Kettering Hospital for treatment, then flown to Ethiopia for rest. It was to be his last stage performance before losing his battle with cancer in 1981.

1985 : Little Richard crashes a rented Nissan 300SX into a telephone pole in West Hollywood. The accident nearly kills him, and his right leg is so badly broken it requires two operations to repair. He credits God with saving his life and continues to preach.

US Stamps - 1993 Rock & Roll Sheet of 35 Stamps, Elvis, Otis, #2730a1992 : The US Postal Service issues a booklet of commemorative rock and roll stamps featuring Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly, Otis Redding, Bill Haley, Ritchie Valens, Clyde McPhatter, and Dinah Washington.

2012 : Green Day is forced to cancel their appearance at the New Orleans’ Voodoo Music Festival, citing Billie Joe Armstrong’s problems with substance abuse and rehab. Armstrong had previously had an onstage outburst mid-show in Las Vegas in September of 2012, which began the band’s decision to get treatment for Billie.

This Day in Music History — September 9

1926 : The Radio Corporation of America, later known as RCA, launches its new radio network, the National Broadcasting Company (later known as NBC).

1956 : Elvis Presley makes the first of three contracted appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show. Sullivan had previously announced he would never have such an act on, but ratings prevailed and Sullivan offered Elvis a record $50,000 for the three shows. Charles Laughton hosts, filling in for an ailing Sullivan as Elvis performs “Don’t Be Cruel,” “Love Me Tender,” “Ready Teddy” and “Hound Dog” but is shot from the waist up only to avoid scandal. The show draws a staggering 54 million viewers.

1975 : Paul McCartney and Wings begin their historic 13-month world tour. US performances will be recorded as the double LP Wings Over America. The group plays to over two million fans total during the course of the tour.

1994 : Green Day play a free concert at the Hatch Shell in Boston. A few songs into their set, many in the crowd cross the line from moshing to rioting, and police order an end to the show. With their album Dookie climbing the charts, the band was playing to exuberant crowds, which caused problems when casual fans found themselves engulfed in mosh pits.

2003 : Simon & Garfunkel make it official, announcing plans to reunite and tour for the first time in 20 years. They get more per ticket than any other tour that year: $136.90. They donate $1 million to The Children’s Health Fund at the end.

This Day in Music History — September 1

1967 : A young guitarist named Boz Scaggs joins The Steve Miller Band, the blues band led by his childhood friend, Steve Miller.

1967 : The Beatles meet up at Paul McCartney’s house in London to decide what to do following the death of their manager, Brian Epstein. They decide to be their own managers, and McCartney takes the lead on most business decisions. With hefty responsibilities outside of music, things get tense and the group breaks up two years later.

1971 : After their successful summer-replacement series, Sonny And Cher begin their fall TV variety series on CBS-TV.

1978 : Emilio Estefan and Gloria Fajardo of Miami Sound Machine get married after two years together.

2011 : While boarding a Southwest flight from Oakland to Burbank, Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong is forced off the flight giving some lip to a flight attendant who asked him to pull up his sagging pants. Armstrong doesn’t take kindly to the request, and eventually he and his traveling companion are booted from the flight. Armstrong takes it to Twitter, writing, “Just got kicked off a southwest flight because my pants sagged too low!” The tweet is quickly retweeted by his followers, forcing Southwest to release a statement apologizing for the incident.