This Day in Music History — September 15

1988 : Dire Straits disbands.

1997 : Elton John’s new version of “Candle In The Wind,” rewritten with lyrics paying tribute to the recently deceased Princess Diana, sells a record 600,000 copies in one day in Britain alone. It would go on to become the biggest-selling single of all time.

1998 : Reba McEntire gets a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in front of the Johnny Grant Building at 7018 Hollywood Boulevard.

2003 : Johnny Cash is buried in the Cash family cemetery in Hendersonville, Tennessee, next to his wife, June Carter Cash. Among the mourners at the private ceremony: Al Gore,Emmylou Harris, and Sheryl Crow.

2004 : Guitarist/songwriter Johnny Ramone (of The Ramones) dies of prostate cancer at his home in Los Angeles, California, at age 55.

This Day in Music History — September 11

1967 : Frank Sinatra, who is playing at The Sands casino in Las Vegas, gets in a fight when he is denied credit as part of a policy put in by the new owners. He breaks two teeth in the altercation and soon takes his talents (and money) to Caesar’s Palace.

1971 : The Jackson 5 cartoon series, called The Jackson 5ive, debuts on ABC. Each episode shows various adventures with animated versions of the group, along with Michael’s pet mice Ray and Charles, and his snake Rosie. The cartoon runs from 1971-1973.

1977 : David Bowie appears on Bing Crosby’s Merrie Olde Christmas special. Bowie refuses to sing “Little Drummer Boy” with Crosby, so his part is rewritten as “Peace On Earth.” Crosby dies a month later, and the duet becomes a Christmas classic, growing even more popular when MTV starts playing the clip a few years later.

2001 : Most radio stations simulcast news after the terrorist attacks take place. As stations gradually return to music, they try to be sensitive about what songs they play, but Clear Channel Communications goes overboard with a list of 165 songs they ask their stations to avoid, including “Smooth Criminal” and “What A Wonderful World.”

This Day in Music History — September 10

1963 : While traveling in London, John Lennon and Paul McCartney encounter Rolling Stones manager Andrew Loog Oldham, who worked as a promoter for The Beatles earlier in the year. Oldham invites them to The Stones rehearsal, where they complete a song they were working on, “I Wanna Be Your Man,” and give it to The Stones, which they use as their second UK single.

1988 : “Sweet Child O’ Mine” by Guns N’ Roses hits #1 for the first of two weeks. The band is opening shows for Aerosmith at the time.

1990 : Starring a young rapper named Will Smith, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air debuts on NBC. Smith hones his acting skills during his six seasons on the show, which features guest appearances by his musical partner, DJ Jazzy Jeff.

1991 : Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” is released as a single, forever changing the musical meaning of the word “Alternative.”

This Day in Music History — September 9

1926 : The Radio Corporation of America, later known as RCA, launches its new radio network, the National Broadcasting Company (later known as NBC).

1956 : Elvis Presley makes the first of three contracted appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show. Sullivan had previously announced he would never have such an act on, but ratings prevailed and Sullivan offered Elvis a record $50,000 for the three shows. Charles Laughton hosts, filling in for an ailing Sullivan as Elvis performs “Don’t Be Cruel,” “Love Me Tender,” “Ready Teddy” and “Hound Dog” but is shot from the waist up only to avoid scandal. The show draws a staggering 54 million viewers.

1975 : Paul McCartney and Wings begin their historic 13-month world tour. US performances will be recorded as the double LP Wings Over America. The group plays to over two million fans total during the course of the tour.

1994 : Green Day play a free concert at the Hatch Shell in Boston. A few songs into their set, many in the crowd cross the line from moshing to rioting, and police order an end to the show. With their album Dookie climbing the charts, the band was playing to exuberant crowds, which caused problems when casual fans found themselves engulfed in mosh pits.

2003 : Simon & Garfunkel make it official, announcing plans to reunite and tour for the first time in 20 years. They get more per ticket than any other tour that year: $136.90. They donate $1 million to The Children’s Health Fund at the end.

This Day in Music History — September 7

1936 : Buddy Holly is born. He would live just 22 years, but influence many of the biggest stars of the ’60s, including The Beatles. Don McLean’s American Pie is about his death.

1984 : With most of her family (including her parents) on the road with The Jacksons Victory tour, 18-year-old Janet Jackson elopes with James DeBarge from the group DeBarge. The marriage would end eight months later.

1996 : Tupac is shot 5 times in a drive-by following a boxing match in Las Vegas. He would die 6 days later.

2008 : MTV makes up for trotting out a lethargic Britney Spears to open their previous year’s Video Music Awards by giving her three awards for Piece Of Me. Kanye West also debuts Love Lockdown on the show

This Day in Music History — September 6

1976 : Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis reunite after 20 years on Lewis’ Labor Day Telethon to benefit the Muscular Dystrophy Association. Frank Sinatra surprised Lewis by bringing out Martin

1987 : Performing as the “Lynyrd Skynyrd Tribute Band,” members of the band who survived their 1977 plane crash perform the first of a series of shows to mark the 10 year anniversary of the crash. The enthusiastic response from fans leads the band to reform permanently and record new material.

1997 : Elton John sings a new version of Candle In The Wind at Princess Diana’s funeral. The new version, which replaces “Goodbye Norma Jean” with “Goodbye England’s Rose,” becomes the best-selling single of all time.

This Day in Music History — September 5

1964 : A British group scores a #1 hit in America with a folk song about a New Orleans brothel when The Animals’ The House Of The Rising Sun tops the chart.

1968 : John Lennon flies to Germany for his role in the movie How I Won the War – the only major non-documentary film in which he would ever appear. He character wears glasses that he would use as the basis for his distinctive eyewear.

1987 : American Bandstand airs on network TV for the last time. ABC picked up the show in 1957, and throughout its run on the network, Dick Clark was the host. The show continued another year in syndication and aired one season on the USA network in 1989.

1991 : The steamy video for Chris Isaak’s “Wicked Game” scoops Best Male Video, Best Cinematography and Best Video from a Film at the MTV Video Music Awards

66 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About The Beatles

Via Buzzfeed 66 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About The Beatles.

REX USA / David Magnus / BuzzFeed

1. John Lennon’s pre-Beatles skiffle group, The Quarry Men, made a record in the summer of 1958 that features Paul McCartney and George Harrison and cost 17 and sixpence to make.

2. The 16-year-old Lennon sung lead on the four tracks they recorded, which included Buddy Holly’s “That’ll Be the Day” and the McCartney-Harrison composition “In Spite of All the Danger”.

3. It was Stuart Sutcliffe, John’s art school friend who was drafted in as bass player, who came up with the name “The Beatals”.

4. The first proper recording the band made was “Cry for a Shadow”, a Lennon-Harrison instrumental number in the style of The Shadows. It was recorded in Hamburg on 22 June 1961 with Pete Best on drums, in the assembly hall of an infants’ school.

5. So keen were they to distinguish themselves from The Shadows that The Beatles didn’t use Fender guitars until 1965.

6. During their lengthy stints of playing to drunk sailors and prostitutes day and night in Hamburg between 1960 and 1962, The Beatles (unknowingly) once ate horse for their Christmas dinner.

7. When they first arrived in Hamburg in 1960, then still teenagers, The Beatles lived in a cinema. Lennon said: “We would go to bed late and be woken up the next day by the sound of the cinema show. We’d try to get into the ladies’ first, which was the cleanest of the cinema’s lavatories, but fat old German women would push past us.”

8. Harrison was deported from Germany for being underage.

9. During a 56-night residency in 1960 at Hamburg’s Kaiserkeller, the band played four sets every day – 7.30–9pm, 9.30–11pm, 11.30pm–1am, and 1.30–2am – seven days a week.

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This Day in Music History — August 9

1964 : Bob Dylan and Joan Baez share the stage for the first time, singing “With God On Our Side” at the Newport Folk Festival.

1986 : Queen play their last live concert with Freddie Mercury at the Knebworth Park Festival in England. An audience of 120,000 hears them close out with “We Will Rock You/We Are The Champions” and “God Save The Queen.”

1995 : The original members of Kiss play together for the first time since 1980 when Peter Criss and Ace Frehley join the current band to record their MTV Unplugged special, which is later released as the album Kiss Unplugged. Not counting Ace Frehley’s 1976 wedding, it also marks the only time the original members performed makeup. The appearance goes over so well that Criss and Frehley rejoin the band in 1996, replacing Bruce Kulick and Eric Singer. The subsequent tour becomes the top grossing tour that year.

2002 : Lisa Marie Presley is married to actor Nicolas Cage, in a union that lasts less than four months.