Rolling Stone’s 100 Greatest Songwriters 10-1

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See Part 1Part 2,Part 3Part 4, Part 5Part 6, Part 7Part 8 and Part 9

10- Stevie Wonder

“I feel there is so much through music that can be said,” Wonder once observed, and the songs he’s been writing for a half-century have more than lived up to that idea. Whether immersing himself in social commentary (“Higher Ground,” “Living for the City”), unabashed sentimentality (“You Are the Sunshine of My Life,” “I Just Called to Say I Love You”), jubilant love (“Signed, Sealed, Delivered I’m Yours”) or gritty disses (“You Haven’t Done Nothin'”), Wonder has consistently tapped into the sum of human emotions and happenings. He was already writing his own songs as a childhood prodigy at Motown during the Sixties (including the 1966 smash “Uptight (It’s Alright).”

As he hit his artistic stride on albums like 1972’s Talking Book and 1973’s Innervisions, he used the recording studio as his palette to create groundbreaking works of soulful self-discovery. “Like a painter, I get my inspiration from experiences that can be painful or beautiful,” he has said. “I always start from a feeling of profound gratitude — you know, ‘Only by the grace of God am I here’— and write from there. Most songwriters are inspired by an inner voice and spirit.” Combined with melodies that can be jubilant, funky or simply gorgeous, Wonder’s songs are so enduring that they’ve been covered by everyone from Sinatra to the Backstreet Boys.

9- Joni Mitchell

Mitchell came out of the coffee-shop folk culture of the Sixties, and she became the standard bearing star of L.A.’s Laurel Canyon scene. But her restless brilliance couldn’t be confined to one moment or movement. She began with songs that only by her later standards seemed simple: “Clouds,” “Both Sides Now,” “Big Yellow Taxi.” But then, banging on her acoustic guitar in startling ways or playing modernist melodies at the piano, she unfurled starkly personal lyrics that pushed beyond “confessional” songwriting towards an almost confrontational intimacy and rawness. “When I realized how popular I was becoming, it was right before Blue,” she recalled, in reference to her 1971 masterpiece. “I went, ‘Oh my God, a lot of people are listening to me.

Well then they better find out who they’re worshiping. Let’s see if they can take it. Let’s get real.’ So I wrote Blue, which horrified a lot of people, you know.” Mitchell’s run of albums from 1970’s Ladies of the Canyon to 1974’s Court and Spark, on which she perfected a jazz-bent studio pop, rival any streak of record-making in pop history, and her lyrical depictions of the ecstasy and heartbreak that came with being a strong woman availing herself of the sexual independence of the Sixties and Seventies offer a unique emotional travelogue of the era. “I had no personal defenses,” she said of her writing at the time. “I felt like a cellophane rapper on a pack of cigarettes.”

8- Paul Simon

If Paul Simon’s career had ended with the breakup of Simon & Garfunkel in 1970, he would still have produced some of the most beloved songs ever – including “The Sound of Silence,” “Mrs. Robinson,” “Bridge Over Troubled Water.” But Simon was just getting started. The quintessential New York singer-songwriter, he switches between styles effortlessly with as much attention to rhythm as melody, a rare quality among artists who came of age in the folk era. Over the decades, his music has incorporated Tin Pan Alley tunecraft, global textures, gentle acoustic reveries, gospel, R&B and electronic music, all without diluting his core appeal as an easeful chronicler of everyday alienation.

Whether he’s operating on a large scale summing up our shared national commitments in 1973’s “American Tune,” or writing a finely wrought personal reflection on lost love like 1986’s “Graceland,” the same wit and literary detail come through. For the generation that came of age during the Sixties and Seventies, he rivaled Bob Dylan in creating a mirror for their journey from youthful innocence to complicated adulthood. “One of my deficiencies is my voice sounds sincere,” Simon told Rolling Stone in 2012. “I’ve tried to sound ironic. I don’t. I can’t. Dylan, everything he sings has two meanings. He’s telling you the truth and making fun of you at the same time. I sound sincere every time.”

7- Carole King/Carole King and Gerry Goffin

Goffin and King were pop’s most prolific songwriting partnership –and, even more impressively, they kept their winning streaks going even after their marriage split up. With King handling melodies and Goffin the lyrics, the two former Queens College schoolmates worked a block away from the Brill Building and wrote many of professional songwriting’s most evocative songs: tracks like “Up on the Roof,” “Will You Love Me Tomorrow,” and “One Fine Day” that were tender snapshots of the adolescent experience. “When Paul and I first got together, we wanted to be the British Goffin and King,” John Lennon once said. As a solo act after their divorce, King gave voice to a generation of women who were establishing their own lives and identities in the Seventies; her 1971 masterpiece Tapestry remains one of the biggest-selling albums ever.

Goffin, meanwhile, supplied the lyrics for a string of hits including Diana Ross’s “Theme From Mahogany (Do You Know Where You’re Going To),” Whitney Houston’s “Saving All My Love for You,” and Gladys Knight and the Pips’ “I’ve Got to Use My Imagination.” For them, there’s nothing crass, and everything earnest, about the art of the pop song. “Once I start to create a song, even if commerce is the motivation, I’m still going to try to write the best song and move people in a way that touches them,” King has said. “People know when you do that. They know that there’s an emotional connection, even if it’s commercial.”

6- Mick Jagger and Keith Richards

Mick Jagger and Keith Richards defined a rock song’s essential components – nasty wit, an unforgettable riff, an explosive chorus – and established a blueprint for future rockers to follow. Their work was at once primal and complex, charged by conflict, desire and anger, and unafraid to be explicit about it musically or lyrically. They wrote personal manifestos with political dimensions like “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” and “Get Off My Cloud”; they brooded on the tumult of the Sixties with “Gimme Shelter” and “Jumpin’ Jack Flash”; they detailed the connections between societal evil and the individual (and made it rock) with “Brown Sugar” and “Sympathy for the Devil.” And sometimes –”Start Me Up,” “Rip This Joint” – they just kicked the doors in and burned the house down.

One of the many, many things Mick Jagger and Keith Richards have disagreed about over the years is how their songwriting partnership got started. Keith has steadfastly claimed that manager Andrew Loog Oldham locked them in a kitchen until they emerged with “As Tears Go By,” while Jagger says the pressure was merely verbal: “He did mentally lock us in a room, but he didn’t literally lock us in.” Like Lennon/McCartney, Jagger and Richards didn’t always write together – “Happy” was all Keith, while “Brown Sugar” all Mick. But both men had a hand in most of the Stones’ hits. “I think it’s essential,” Jagger once told Rolling Stone of the idea of partnership. “People. . .like partnerships because they can identify with the drama of two people in partnership. They can feed off a partnership, and that keeps people entertained. Besides, if you have a successful partnership, it’s self-sustaining.”

5- Smokey Robinson

“Smokey Robinson was like God in our eyes,” Paul McCartney once said. The melodic and lyrical genius behind Motown’s greatest hits is the most influential and innovative R&B tunesmith of all time. Robinson was an elegant, delicate singer and poetic writer whose songs brought new levels of nuance to the Top 40. The son of a truck driver raised in what he called “the suave part of the slums,” Robinson had his first hit in 1960 with the Miracles’ “Shop Around” and went onto pen the Temptations’ “My Girl” and “Get Ready,” Mary Wells’ “My Guy,” the Marvelettes’ “Don’t Mess With Bill,” Marvin Gaye’s “Ain’t That Peculiar” and many more.

With the Miracles, he had his hand in more than a dozen Top 20 hits (including “The Tracks of My Tears” and “I Second That Emotion”), songs that describe heartbreak with stunning turns of phrase: “Sweetness was only heartache’s camouflage/The love I saw in you was just a mirage,” he rhymed in 1967. Though Bob Dylan’s famous quote calling Smokey “the greatest living poet” might actually be apocryphal, everyone believed it for decades because the songs backed it up perfectly. “My theory of writing is to write a song that has a complete idea and tells a story in the time allotted for a record,” he told Rolling Stone in 1968. “It has to be something that really means something, not just a bunch of words on music.”

4- Chuck Berry

He was rock & roll’s first singer-songwriter, and the music’s first guitar hero, as well. Berry was a Muddy Waters fan who quickly learned the power of his own boundary-crossing “songs of novelties and feelings of fun and frolic” when he transformed a country song, “Ida Red,” into his first single, “Maybellene,” a Top Five pop hit. His songs were concise and mythic, celebrating uniquely American freedoms – fast cars in “Maybellene,” class mobility in “No Money Down,” the country itself in “Back in the U.S.A.” – or protesting their denial in coded race parables like “Brown Eyed Handsome Man” and “Promised Land,” which he wrote while in jail inspired by the freedom marches, consulting an almanac for the route.

Bob Dylan based the meter of “Subterranean Homesick Blues” on “Too Much Monkey Business,” Mick Jagger and Keith Richards soaked up the idea of no satisfaction from “30 Days,” and John Lennon once summed up his immeasurable impact by saying, “If you gave rock & roll another name, you might call it Chuck Berry.”

3- John Lennon

John Lennon’s command of songwriting was both absolute and radically original: that was clear from his earliest collaborations with Paul McCartney, which revolutionized not just music, but the world. “They were doing things nobody was doing,” Bob Dylan once remembered of a drive through Colorado when the Beatles ruled the radio. “I knew they were pointing the direction where music had to go.” That meant first reconnecting pop music to the awesome power of early rock & roll – Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly and Little Richard – then pushing forward with darker, more personal music like “Hard Day’s Night” and “In My Life” that stretched the boundaries of the capabilities of pop, and then diving into the avant garde with music that had only existed in his dreams: “Strawberry Fields Forever,” “A Day in the Life,” “Revolution #9.”

No one better rendered the complexity of personal life or global politics, or better connected the two, than Lennon during his solo career in universal songs like “Watching the Wheels” and “Imagine.” “I’m interested in something that means something for everyone,” he told Rolling Stone in 1970, “not just for a few kids listening to wallpaper.”

2- Paul McCartney

“I’m in awe of McCartney,” Bob Dylan told Rolling Stone in 2007. “He’s about the only one that I’m in awe of.” Sir Paul is pop’s greatest melodist, with a bulging songbook that includes many of the most-performed and best-loved tunes of the past half-century. McCartney has always had a much broader range than silly love songs. He’s the weirdo behind “Temporary Secretary” and the feral basher behind “Helter Skelter.” But part of what he brought to the Beatles was his passion for the wit and complexity of pre-rock songwriting, from Fats Waller to Peggy Lee.

“Even in the early days we used to write things separately, because Paul was always more advanced than I was,” John Lennon once said. Songs like “Yesterday” and “Let It Be” became modern standards, and post-Beatles, McCartney led Wings to six Number One hits, among them “Band on the Run” and “Listen to What the Man Said.” “The truth is the problem’s always been the same, really,” he said earlier this year. “When you think about it, when you’re writing a song, you’re always trying to write something that you love and the people will love.”

1- Bob Dylan

Dylan’s vision of American popular music was transformative. No one set the bar higher, or had greater impact. “You want to write songs that are bigger than life,” he wrote in his memoir, Chronicles. “You want to say something about strange things that have happened to you, strange things you have seen.” Dylan himself saw no difference between modern times and the storied past – reading about the Civil War helped him understand the Sixties –which allowed him to rewire folk ballads passed down through generations into songs that both electrified the current moment and became lasting standards. Early songs like “Blowin’ in the Wind” became hits for others –Peter, Paul & Mary took it Number Two on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1963; Stevie Wonder brought it Number Nine two years later – and reshaped the ambitions of everyone from the Beatles to Johnny Cash.

Then Dylan began to climb the charts on his own with music that turned pop into prophecy: “Subterranean Homesick Blues,” “Like a Rolling Stone,” “Positively Fourth Street,” “Rainy Day Women #12 & 35.” His personas shifted, but songs like “Tangled Up in Blue,” “Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door” and “Forever Young” continued to define their eras in lasting ways. And alone among his peers Dylan’s creativity was ceaseless –2000’s Love and Theft returned him to a snarling sound that rivaled his electric youth, marking a renaissance that continues unabated. “A song is like a dream, and you try to make it come true,” Dylan wrote. “They’re like strange countries that you have to enter.” And so we do, marveling at the sights, over and over again.

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This Day in Music History — December 22

1938 : Country singer-songwriter Red Steagall is born Russell Steagall in Gainesville, Texas. Discovered Reba McEntire in 1975.

1969 : John Lennon and Yoko Ono meet with Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and Minister of Health John Munro to discuss drug abuse.

1989 : Jordin Sparks is born in Phoenix, Arizona. At age 17, she would win the sixth season of American Idol (2007).

2001 : T.I. is arrested in his native Atlanta for illegal gun possession. He allegedly tells police that his name is Douglas Morgan rather than his real name, Clifford Harris. The rapper is released without serious conviction.

2002 : Joe Strummer of The Clash dies of a heart attack at age 50. The Clash are inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame a few months later.

2012 : Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood marries his girlfriend Sally Humphreys; Wood at age 65 and Humphreys at 34. Coincidentally, the world did not end on the day before, as proponents of the Mayan calendar would have it. Perhaps this bolstered their optimism?

LENNON or McCARTNEY : A Beatles Documentary

550 Artists. 10 Years. 1 Question.

550 Artists were interviewed over the last ten years. At some point during those interviews, they were asked a question and told to answer with one word only. Some stuck to one, some said more, some answered quickly, some thought it through, and some didn’t answer at all.

That question… Lennon or McCartney.

Featuring: Robert DeNiro, Katy Perry, Lady GaGa, Kevin Spacey, Tina Fey, Jason Bateman, Morgan Freeman, Kevin Smith, Benedict Cumberbatch, Ed Sheeran, Kendrick Lamar, Selena Gomez, Justin Bieber, Priyanka Chopra, Matthew Healy from The 1975, James Franco, Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson, The Goo Goo Dolls, Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis, Ed Helms, Gary, Oldman, Big Sean, Carrie Underwood, New Kids on the Block’s Jordan Knight & Danny Wood, Fall Out Boy’s Pete Wentz & Andy Hurley, Pete Townshend from The Who, Stone Temple Pilots & Velvet Revolver’s Scott Weiland, Sam Smith, Bridgit Mendler, Sylvester Stallone, Kevin Hart, The Band’s Robbie Robertson, Lights, David Byrne from The Talking Heads, Death Cab for Cutie, Josh Ritter, Mounties, Hey Rosetta!, Broken Social Scene’s Kevin Drew, Jason Collett, Emily Haines & James Shaw from Metric, Dan Mangan, Said The Whale, Arkells, Bo Diddley, Counting Crows’ Adam Duritz, Jimmy Eat World, Sarah Wayne Callies, Matt Walsh, Tony Hale, Taylor Kitsch, Pierce Brosnan, Emma Thompson, Luke Doucet from Whitehorse, Blue Rodeo, Florida-Georgia Line, Rascal Flatts, Tim McGraw, Brandon Flowers from The Killers, Theory of A Deadman, Nickelback, No Doubt, Gwen Stefani, Chad Kroeger, Darius Rucker, Aaron Lewis, Hayden, Metallica, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Rian Johnson, Mark Ruffalo, Cobie Smulders, Jack McBrayer, David Suzuki, Jakob Dylan, Keane, K-OS, Aaron Eckhart, Aubrey Plaza, Matthew Goode, Allen Leech, Elle Fanning, Dax Shepard, David Dobkin, Kate Mara, Rebecca Hall, Susan Downey, Gavin DeGraw, Black Sabbath’s Ozzy Osbourne & Geezer Butler, Zoe Saldana Kate Nash, Kathleen Edwards, Donald Glover aka Childish Gambino, Wu-Tang Clan, LL Cool J, Classified, Dragonette, Serena Ryder, Justin Long, Shawn Levy, Vera Farmiga, Vincent D’Onofrio, The New Pornographers, Jenny Lewis, Rilo Kiley, Against Me!’s Laura Jane Grace, Cake’s John McRae, Slash, Simon Helberg from The Big Bang Theory, Zach Braff, Zach Knighton, Zachary Quinto, Chris Pine, J.J. Abrams, John Cho, Alice Eve, Karl Urban, Cillian Murphy, Train’s Pat Monahan, Maroon 5’s Adam Levine, Gaslight Anthem, Rise Against, Our Lady Peace’s Raine Maida, Motley Crue’s Nikki Sixx & Vince Neil, Arctic Monkeys’ Alex Turner, Chloe Bennett from Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Danielle Panabaker & Candice Patton from The Flash, The Dark Knight’s Wally Pfister, Miss Piggy, Tokyo Police Club, Eva Green, Jack O’Connell, Dallas Green from City & Colour, Missi Pyle, The Sex Pistols, The Doors, Shad, Russell Peters, Supertramp, Sam Roberts, Aaron Paul, Lake Bell, Paul Bettany, Lena Heady, The Head & The Heart, Matthew Good, Marianas Trench, Josh Ramsay, Carly Rae Jepsen, Owl City, Gina Gershon, Phoenix, Hedley, Jacob Hoggard, Simple Plan, Skylar Grey, Lady Antebellum, Imagine Dragons, Brett Kissell, Ellie Goulding, Edgar Wright, Nick Frost, The Lumineers, Nikki Williams, Grace Potter, The Dixie Chicks, Bastille, Joel Plaskett, Sarah McLachlan, Franz Ferdinand, Great Big Sea, Alan Doyle, Mike Tompkins, Tom Odell, Jason Priestley, Of Monsters & Men, Paramore, Hayley Williams, Alison Brie, Zack Snyder, Todd Phillips, Passion Pit, Baz Luhrmann, Amanda Palmer, The Cult’s Ian Astbury, Billy Talent, Alanis Morissette, Mumford & Sons, Phillip Phillips, The Hives, Shirley Manson, Garbage, Joshua Jackson, PSY, Three Days Grace, All-American Rejects, Tyson Ritter, Hanson, Will.I.Am, Rita Ora, Sloan, Bret McKenzie, Flight of the Conchords, Adam Lambert, The Fray, Stephen Root, The Sheepdogs, Beau Willimon, House of Cards, Ziggy Marley, Daniel Johns from Silverchair, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeroes’ Alexander Ebert, Steven Page, Barenaked Ladies, Tracy Morgan, Tommy Chong, Garfunkel & Oates, The Tragically Hip’s Gord Downie, Danny Boyle, Monica Potter, INXS, Rick Springfield, Levar Burton, Colin Hay from Men at Work, Fitz & The Tantrums, Michael Fitzpatrick, Chris Jericho, Aerosmith, Anna Gunn fromBreaking Bad, The Band Perry, Casey Wilson, Charli XCX, Florence Welch, Finger Eleven, Frightened Rabbit, Fun., Florence + The Machine, Guillermo Del Toro, Jimmy Cliff, John Cale, The Velvet Undergound, Jonas Brothers, Nick Jonas, Joe Jonas, Kevin Jonas. Justin Kirk, Ken Jeong, Matchbox Twenty, Rob Thomas, Norman Reedus, Rob Zombie and more.

While My Guitar Gently Weeps. Written by George Harrison. Performed by the Matt Blais Connection.

I Will. Written by Paul McCartney. Performed by Dan Mangan and Gord Grdina.

Directed, edited and produced by Matt Schichter.

This Day in Music History — December 20

1973 : Bobby Darin dies at age 37 after 8 hours of surgery to repair his ailing heart.

1975 : Joe Walsh replaces Bernie Leadon in the Eagles. Walsh was previously a member of the James Gang.

1980 : “(Just Like) Starting Over” gives John Lennon his first #1 single as a solo artist in the UK, 12 days after his murder.

2010 : Bret Michaels, lead singer of Poison, winds up his VH1 reality TV show Bret Michaels: Life As I Know It by sticking a rock on the finger of Kristi Gibson, longtime on-and-off girlfriend for 18 years – despite his former reality TV show, Rock of Love, in which he held a contest to let women get engaged to him concurrent with this relationship. She accepts his proposal on-air. They later break the engagement off. Bret Michaels never takes off his head rag or cowboy hat the entire time. Also, Michaels has now made four subsequent relationships the subject of reality TV shows. Nobody finds anything weird about this at all.

2012 : Rapper Fat Joe pleads guilty in federal court in New Jersey to tax evasion charges. He is charged with failing to pay taxes on over $1 million of income in each of 2007 and 2008, and is expected to serve in the neighborhood of 2 years at sentencing.

This Day in Music History — December 17

1954 : Bill Haley and his Comets’ “Shake, Rattle and Roll” (originally recorded by Big Joe Turner) hits #4 on the UK charts. It is the first rock song to make that chart.

1963 : A Beatles song (“I Want To Hold Your Hand”) is played on American radio for the first time, in Washington, DC, at WWDC.

1967 : The Beatles’ John Lennon and George Harrison throw a party in London for the area secretaries of their official Fan Club. The film Magical Mystery Tour is screened here for the first time.

1977 : The Sex Pistols, booked on Saturday Night Live, are denied entry into the US based on various band members’ criminal records and “moral turpitude.” Elvis Costello takes their place and makes his last appearance on Saturday Night Live – he is banned because he performs “Radio Radio” after being told not to by the show’s producer.

1982 : The Who play the last show of their farewell tour at Toronto’s Maple Leaf Gardens, which is filmed for an HBO special called Who’s Last. They re-form to play Live Aid in 1985, then tour again in 1989.

1986 : The Doobie Brothers reunite for a benefit concert in Palo Alto, CA, which eventually leads to a reunion tour and album.

This Day in Music History — December 14

1977 : At the peak of the Disco era, the film Saturday Night Fever opens in New York City. The soundtrack contains five #1 hits, including “Stayin’ Alive.”

1980 : At widow Yoko Ono’s request, a ten-minute worldwide silent vigil is held at 2:00 PM EST for John Lennon, who had been shot down just six days earlier. Over 100,000 observe the vigil in New York’s Central Park alone, while 30,000 observe the vigil in Liverpool.

1999 : In a much-publicized show, Paul McCartney returns to play the Cavern Club in Liverpool for the first time since 1963. Joining him are Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour and Deep Purple’s Ian Paice.

2012 : Stalker Jacob Nicholas Kulke is arrested outside a residence belonging to Taylor Swift and is charged with trespassing. Kulke claims that he had been in touch with Swift through social media and had been planning to show up and “surprise her for her birthday.” Though the singer had just had her birthday the previous day, she’d been overseas at the time and likely wouldn’t be too happy with Kulke scaling her fence.

This Day in Music History — December 12

1915 : Frank Sinatra is born Francis Albert Sinatra in Hoboken, New Jersey.

1974 : Rolling Stones guitarist Mick Taylor leaves the band. Ron Wood will eventually replace him after several candidates are auditioned.

1980 : Four days after John Lennon’s murder, thousands of marchers make their way from down Fifth Avenue to the Dakota Building, where he lived and was killed.

1998 : Luciano Pavarotti becomes the first classical musician to perform on Saturday Night Live when he sings ”Adeste Fideles” with Vanessa Williams.

2007 : Ike Turner dies of a cocaine overdose in San Marcos, California, at age 76. He was also struggling with emphysema and cardiovascular disease.

This Day in Music History — December 8

1963 : Frank Sinatra Jr. is kidnapped in Lake Tahoe, NV, and freed three days later after his famous father pays the $240,000 ransom. The three men responsible are eventually caught and incarcerated.

1969 : Testifying at his trial for possesion of hashish and heroin in the Toronto Supreme Court, Jimi Hendrix claimed that he had now “outgrown” drugs. The jury found him not guilty after eight hours of deliberations.

1980 : At 11:07 PM EST, John Lennon is murdered in New York by a deranged fan just outside the Dakota Hotel, New York City. Lennon was shot in his chest, back and left arm and was pronounced dead thirty minutes later. Earlier that day, the killer had met Lennon outside the Dakota and had him sign a copy of his latest album, Double Fantasy.

1995 : Four months after the death of founding member Jerry Garcia, The Grateful Dead officially announce their breakup.

2004 : Dimebag Darrell is shot dead on stage while performing with his band Damageplan at Alrosa Villa in Columbus, Ohio. The murderer, Nathan Gray, kills three others, before being shot dead himself by a police officer.

This Day in Music History — December 5

1968 : Graham Nash quits The Hollies and a few days later forms Crosby, Stills and Nash.

1980 : Just 3 days before John Lennon is killed, U2 play their first show in the US when they perform at The Ritz Ballroom in New York City.

1998 : Billboard changes the way they calculate the Hot 100, finally accounting for airplay. Previously, if a song wasn’t available for purchase as a single, it couldn’t chart. As labels withheld singles to goose album sales, popular songs like “Don’t Speak” and “One Headlight” were conspicuously absent from the chart, prompting the change.

2001 : David Crosby and Don Henley headline a benefit concert that raises $300,000 for children of the victims of the 9/11 attacks.

This Day in Music History — November 24

1961 : In yet another important development for British blues-rock, Chicago blues legend Howlin’ Wolf makes his first appearance in the UK for his first European tour, touring behind his latest single, “Little Baby.”

1974 : In the midst of his infamous “Lost Weekend,” John Lennon rehearses with Elton John for Elton’s upcoming Madison Square Garden performance, at which Lennon will make a surprise cameo.

1991 : Cyndi Lauper marries the actor David Thornton. Little Richard, who is an ordained minister, presides over the ceremony and performs at the reception.

1997 : On today’s episode of Judge Judy, Johnny Rotten of The Sex Pistols is the defendant in a wrongful termination lawsuit brought on by his former drummer. Judy Rules in Rotten’s favor, and thanks him for his patience.

2003 : Glen Campbell is arrested for drunk driving and hit-and-run charges in Phoenix, AZ, after crashing his BMW into another car at another intersection and continuing on. The 67-year-old Campbell, who is sentenced to ten days in jail, allegedly knees an officer’s groin during the arrest.