Taylor Swift Performs at The Grammy Museum — Watch

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Just this week, Three videos of Taylor swift performing at a mini-concert held at the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles, California back in September. Taylor performed ‘Out of the Woods,’Wildest Dreams,’ and ‘Blank Space.’

The stripped down, acoustic versions of these songs were a throwback to Taylor’s singer-songwriter days and we loved every second of it.

Out of the Woods

 

Blank Space

 

Wildest Dreams

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BuzzFeed’s 89 Must-Hear Covers Of Taylor Swift’s “1989” Album

89. Folk-pop singer Kina Grannis’ gentle “Clean.”

88. Emilie & Ogden’s elegant harp cover of “Style.”

87. Nineteen-year-old Alice Kristiansen’s delicate “Wildest Dreams.”

86. Gardiner Sisters’ acoustic “Style / All You Had To Do Was Stay / Out Of the Woods” mashup.

85. YouTuber Tiffany Alvord’s glossy “Blank Space.”

84. Against The Current’s pop-punk “Shake It Off” cover.

83. Macy Kate and Ben Kheng’s “Bad Blood” break-up anthem.

82. A brassy take on “Shake It Off” from Postmodern Jukebox and Von Smith.

81. Tyler Ward’s tender renedition of “Blank Space.”

80. Madilyn Bailey’s heavy-lidded “Wildest Dreams.”

 

79. Anthem Lights’ spacey, harmonic “Out Of The Woods.”

78. A stripped-down “Welcome To New York” from Lauren Bonnell.

77. Fourteen-year-old Amanda Rose’s sleek, shiny “How You Get The Girl.”

76. Laura Scott’s soaring “This Love.”

75. An understated cover of “I Wish You Would” from Amrita Soon.

74. Alexi Blue’s raspy “Style.”

73. A back-and-forth version of “Bad Blood” from Megan Davies and Luke Preston.

72. Mia Rose’s back porch cover of “Style.”

71. Payson Lewis and Rumer Willis’ strings-heavy “Out Of The Woods.”

70. Floridia-based singer Tayler Buono’s swoon-worthy “Wildest Dreams.”

  

69. Kelsey K’s countrified “New Romantics.”

68. A crunchy pop-rock cover of “Bad Blood” from TeraBrite.

67. MAX and Nick Dungo’s twilight take on “Style.”

66. Drew Tabor and Leila’s hushed “Clean” duet.

65. Seventeen-year-old Macy Kate’s deliciously bratty “Style” cover.

64. A pulsing, disco-pop take on “Wildest Dreams” from Brandon Skeie.

63. Charity Vance’s synthed-out “Style.”

62. Guitarist Kelly Valleau’s fingerstyle “Wildest Dreams” cover.

61. A sax-heavy version of “Style” from South Africa’s Rubber Duc.

60. Sullivan’s elastic, emo “Style.”

 

59. At Sunset’s anthemic “Wonderland.”

58. Twenty-two-year-old Mackenzie Johnson’s simple, straight-forward “You Are In Love.”

57. A surging electo-pop cover of “Style” from Toronto-based trio The Heist.

56. Rhodes’ aching “Blank Space.”

55. Canadian Melanie Ungar’s effervescent “This Love

54. Death Come Cover Me’s screamo “Shake It Off.”

53. An emotional “I Wish You Would” cover from Swedish indie-pop singerULRIKA.

52. Ryan Streeter and Matthew John Cover’s magnetic “I Know Places.”

51. Girl group GUDGUD’s red-hot “Bad Blood.”

50. Giorgio’s Spanish translation of “I Know Places.”

 

49. Lakoda’s paranoid pop-rock rendition of “I Know Places.”

48. Meghan Trainor serves vocals on her ukulele-assisted cover of “Shake It Off.”

47. Amy Wragg’s sugary sweet “How You Get The Girl.”

46. An unapologetically slick version of “Style” from Justin Bryte.

45. Taylor Acorn’s Nashville-friendly “All You Had To Do Was Stay.”

44. Anthony Vincent’s Disturbed-inspired “Bad Blood.”

43. A hard-rock take on “Wildest Dreams” from the band Halocene.

42. Hayley Solano’s breathless “You Are In Love.”

41. Amasic’s Green Day-esque “Style.”

40. A pop-punk “Wonderland” from Minds Like These.

 

39. Nineteen-year-old Cillian Andersson’s wholesome “I Wish You Would.”

38. Wonderful Humans’ sparse, sexy “Shake It Off.”

37. A soothing, piano-only version of “This Love” from Nuetful.

36. Sydney Day’s angst-ridden “I Wish You Would.”

35. A he-said-she-said cover of “Out Of The Woods” from Dave Days and Linda Lind.

34. Jemma Johnson’s sultry “I Know Places.”

33. English singer-songwriter Lucy Rose’s thorny “Bad Blood.”

32. An intoxicating rendition of “Style” from Australian indie-rockers San Cisco.

31. Pop-rocker Andie Case’s anxious “I Know Places.”

30. Gengahr’s dreamy “Blank Space.”

 

29. Relic Hearts’ aggro “Out Of The Woods.”

28. Guitarist Ivo Cabrera’s “Welcome To New York” instrumental.

27. A speedy version of “Bad Blood” English rockers Drenge.

26. Anna Corley’s soulful living room cover of “New Romantics.”

25. Yuuwii and Weiwen’s somber “Bad Blood.”

24. Viral stars Tanner Patrick and Rajiv Dhall’s buoyant “Shake It Off.”

23. Laura Buitrago’s Spanish-language version of “Bad Blood.”

22. IFMENOT’s barreling “Style.”

21. A classical “Bad Blood” instrumental from Brooklyn Duo.

20. THIRDSTORY’s seductive “Style.”

  

19. Imagine Dragons’ flirtatious “Blank Space.”

18. Utah-based singer Maddie Wilson’s melancholy “How You Get The Girl.”

17. Drummer Anthony Ghazel’s percussion-heavy “I Wish You Would” cover.

16. Irish singer-songwriter SOAK’s plaintive “Shake It Off.”

15. Labrinth’s groovy “Shake It Off.”

14. Viral duo SUPERFRUIT’s maniac “1989” album mashup.

13. Ryan Adams’ Springsteen-esque “Welcome To New York.”

12. Postmodern Jukebox’s red-lip, classic take on “Style.”

11. New Jersey-based rockers Screaming Females’ yelping “Shake It Off.”

 
10. Louisa Wendorff and Devin Dawson, “Blank Space/Style”

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This clever mashup of “Blank Space” and “Style” by Nashville-based musicians Louisa Wendorff and Devin Dawson turns Taylor’s hits into a moving he-said-she-said duet. The video went viral late last year, prompting Taylor herself todeclare that she was “OBSESSED” with the cover on Twitter.

9. Stephen Malkmus And The Jicks, “Blank Space”

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Months before Ryan Adams boosted Taylor’s indie cred, the superstar got an arguably more impressive co-sign from Pitchfork fave Stephen Malkmus. The Pavement frontman performed a cover of “Blank Space” with his band Stephen Malkmus And The Jicks at a charity event in Portland, Oregon. While the song was apparently chosen by his daughter, Malkmus committed and the result is a dead-pan delight.

8. Charli XCX, “Shake It Off”

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In February, during a visit to BBC Radio 1’s Live Lounge, Charli XCX and her all-girl band performed a speedy, stripped-down version of “Shake It Off” that transformed the glossy mega-hit into a manic pop-punk anthem.

7. Vance Joy, “I Know Places”

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After Taylor invited Vance Joy to open for her 1989 World Tour, the Australian singer-songwriter uploaded a YouTube video of himself singing “I Know Places” to celebrate. Gentle and hushed, the cover replaces the original’s paranoia with a knowing kind of tenderness that brings the song’s romantic undertones to the forefront.

6. I Prevail, “Blank Space”

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Pop and post-hardcore: how different are they really? If I Prevail’s “Blank Space” cover is any indication, not particularly! All howling, growling rage, the band taps into the original’s sublimated fury, highlighting all the anger and resentment bubbling under the surface. The result? Brilliantly weird.

5. Ingrid Michaelson, “Clean”

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Last December, Ingrid Michaelson honored Taylor at Billboard’s Women In Music Event with a heart-wrenching piano cover of “Clean.” The singer-songwriter (and official #squad member) peeled back the song’s lush synths to reveal the fragile emotions at its core.

4. Alessia Cara, “Bad Blood”

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The way Alessia Cara completely overhauls the song with the just some finger snaps and the rough edges of her voice is, to quote Taylor herself, “AMAZING.”

3. Kelly Clarkson, “Shake It Off”

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If you’ve ever wondered what “Shake It Off” would sound like as a gospel song, Kelly Clarkson has got you covered. The pop star took her fans to church with a wailing cover of the empowerment anthem during a concert in Buffalo, New York last October.

2. Todrick Hall, “4 Taylor (Mashup)”

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OK, before any of y’all complain: I know that “4 Taylor” includes snippets from all five of Taylor’s albums. There are hooks from Fearless, Speak Now, Red, and evenTaylor Swift sprinkled throughout the medley. The said, 1989 is obviously the focus and foundation of Todrick Hall’s epic mashup, which condenses the entire album’s narrative down to an impressively catchy four minutes.

1. Ryan Adams, “Shake It Off”

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The highlight of Ryan Adams’ 1989 cover album is his depressed but defiant cover of “Shake It Off.” While he sounds genuinely tormented by the knowledge that the haters are just going to keep hating, he’s determined to shake it off.

Taylor Swift And Lisa Kudrow Sang ‘Smelly Cat’ Onstage And All is Right in the World

For her fifth show at the Staples Center in Los Angeles on Wednesday, Swift and Kudrow sang a simple, but beloved song of a smelly cat.

Taylor introduced the song, “This singer, she’s only ever played in coffee houses before. She’s never played in a big venue like this so please make her feel welcome. Her name is Phoebe Buffay.”

Watch below

Taylor Swift Performs With Uzo Aduba

During her Saturday night show at the Staples Center in Los Angeles,Taylor sat down for an acoustic performance of her song “White Horse,” with Uzo Aduba. The “Orange is the New Black” actress joined Swift on stage once before in July, along with a #squad of supermodels.

RollingStone’s 100 Greatest Songwriters 100-90

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100- Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson

Benny and Björn had already been a songwriting duo for six years when they teamed up with their girlfriends Anni-Frid Lyngstad and Agnetha Fältskog — who were both Swedish pop stars already — to form Abba. The two of them were hardcore about songwriting: they bought a cottage on the island of Viggsö where they could focus on making their music and lyrics as catchy as humanly possible. “Each song had to be different,” Andersson said in 2002, “because, in the Sixties, that’s what the Beatles had done. The challenge was to not do another ‘Mamma Mia’ or ‘Waterloo.'” Ulvaeus’s lyrics grew progressively darker over the course of Abba’s career, even as the band became so unbelievably popular that they were able to release an 18-song greatest hits album simply called Number Ones. After the band split up, Ulvaeus and Andersson went on to collaborate on several musicals — including the Abba jukebox musical, Mamma Mia!, one of the most successful in Broadway history.

99- Tom T. Hall

Hall was an English major who said he learned to write songs by osmosis, soaking up everything from Dickens to Hemingway. His best work was charged with literary irony but unfolded with the ease of spoken language, as when the mini-skirted heroine of “Harper Valley P.T.A.” struts into the local junior high and exposes small-town hypocrisy by asking why Mrs. Taylor uses so much ice when her husband’s out of town. A Number One pop and country hit for Jeannie C. Riley in 1968, it freed Hall to record his own work, which included songs about burying a man who owed him 40 dollars, mourning the death of the local hero who taught him how to drink and play guitar, and “Trip to Hyden,” a journalistic tale of a drive to the scene of a mining disaster that was part Woody Guthrie, part Studs Turkel. One of Nashville’s most overtly political songwriters, he was a liberal who recorded “Watergate Blues” and turned a drink in a bar after the 1972 Democratic convention into a Number One country hit called “Old Dogs, Children and Watermelon Wine.” “I couldn’t write the ‘Darling, you left alone and blue’ or ‘I’m drunk in this bar and crying’ [songs]— I just didn’t get it,” he once said. “And so I started writing these story songs.”

98- Otis Blackwell

A Brooklynite who was equally entranced by R&B and country (claiming his favorite singer was C&W mainstay Tex Ritter), Otis Blackwell began his career with 1953’s “Daddy Rollin’ Stone,” which has been covered repeatedly. But large-scale success as a performer eluded him. “I didn’t dig it. Got more into writing,” he said. When Elvis Presley recorded one of his songs, the result was 1956’s epochal “Don’t Be Cruel,” which was simultaneously Number One on the pop, R&B and country charts. Blackwell subsequently gave Elvis “All Shook Up” and “Return to Sender,” and wrote a cluster of hits for other artists, including “Great Balls of Fire” for Jerry Lee Lewis. And even though Blackwell’s own singing career never took off, it’s been noted that his vocals on demos of songs that Presley recorded were followed faithfully by the King. “At certain tempo, the way Elvis sang was the result of copying Otis’ demos,” said Blackwell’s friend Doc Pomus. Oddly, Blackwell and Presley never met.

97- Taylor Swift

Many singer-songwriters reach the point where they have too many great tunes to fit into a live show. Taylor Swift reached that peak before she turned 21. And then she just kept going. She might be the youngest artist on this list — as you may have heard, she was born in 1989, the year Green Day released their first record. But she’s already written two or three careers’ worth of keepers. “Hi, I’m Taylor,” she told the crowds on her Red tour. “I write songs about my feelings. I’m told I have a lot of feelings.” Swift’s first three albums display her emotional yet uncommonly inventive country style — even early hits like “Our Song” and “Tim McGraw” sound like nobody else. (Only she could slip the line “Any snide remarks from my father about your tattoos will be ignored” into a teen romance like “Ours.”) But she’s really hit her stride with the pop mastery of Red and 1989, especially on confessional ballads like “Clean” and “All Too Well.” There’s no limit to where she can go from here.

“If you listen to my songs, they tell stories,” Missy Elliott has said. “I write almost as if I’m in conversation with somebody.” The crucible of her collaboration with Timbaland was the Swing Mob, a loose constellation of performers and producers who worked with Jodeci’s DeVante Swing in the early Nineties. Tim and Missy started working in earnest as a writing team in 1996, when they collaborated on most of Aaliyah’s One in a Million. That was followed by Missy’s 1997 breakthrough Supa Dupa Fly — a set of cool, witty, deceptively minimal tracks that flipped between hip-hop, R&B and electronica with finger-snapping ease — and a string of genre-melting records like “Get Ur Freak On” and “Work It” that lasted until the early 2000s. The duo has also penned hits for other artists including SWV’s “Can We,” Total’s “Trippin'” and Tweet’s “Call Me.” Missy hasn’t released a new album for 10 years, but she and Timbaland have dropped hints that they’ve got something brewing.

95- The Bee Gees

America first discovered the Bee Gees with the 1977 disco soundtrack Saturday Night Fever. But that multiplatinum triumph was just the tip of the iceberg: Australian brothers Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb were massively successful songwriters for decades. Elton John has called them “a huge influence on me as a songwriter”; Bono has said their catalog makes him “ill with envy.” The Bee Gees’ earliest hits (“New York Mining Disaster 1941,” “To Love Somebody”) were melancholy psychedelia, and their first U.S. Number One single, “How Can You Mend a Broken Heart,” was promptly covered by Al Green. But when they took a stab at disco with 1975’s “Jive Talkin’,” their career kicked into an even higher gear. Besides their own hits (including a string of six consecutive Number Ones), the brothers wrote the title song for Grease, Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton’s “Islands in the Stream,” Barbra Streisand’s “Guilty,” and Destiny’s Child’s “Emotion.” “We see ourselves first and foremost as composers, writing for ourselves and other people,” Robin Gibb said.

Maybe it’s his family’s blue-collar background or the years he spent delivering mail before becoming a full-time musician. But John Prine has always had the innate ability to emphatically capture the highs, lows and occasional laughs of everyday Americans and fringe characters: the drug-addled vet in “Sam Stone,” the lonely older folks in “Angel from Montgomery” and “Hello in There.” One of a group of early Seventies singer-songwriters to get pegged with the unfortunate tag “New Dylan,” Prine has written poignant songs of romantic despair (“Speed of the Sound of Loneliness”), songs that sound like centuries-old mountain ballads (“Paradise”) and ribald comic masterpieces aimed at advice columns and various crazies. “You write a song about something that you think might be taboo, you sing it for other people and they immediately recognize themselves in it,” Prine says. “I call it optimistic pessimism. You admit everything that’s wrong and you talk about it in the sharpest terms, in the keenest way you can.”

“Back then, I just wanted to write songs I could be proud of and be able to play in five years,” Billie Joe Armstrong said last year of his attitude while creating Green Day’s 1994 pop-punk breakthrough Dookie. The LP went on to sell millions and Armstrong — who didn’t get the credit he deserved as a writer back in the days of more serious-minded bands like Nirvana and Pearl Jam — has amassed one of the most impressive song books of the last 20 years. His 1996 acoustic ballad “Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)” has become a standard and a pop cultural touchstone; the Who-scale ambition of 2004’s American Idiot made for a rock-opera that remains a totemic response to the Bush era; and Green Day’s recent three-album trilogy, Uno!, Dos!, Tre!), displayed a mastery of styles from throughout rock & roll history. And Armstrong is a punk through and through: the whole band gets songwriting credit on its hugely successful catalog.

Paul Westerberg wasn’t precious about his craft (“I hate music/It’s got too many notes,” he sang on the first Replacements album in 1981). But he become the American punk-rock poet laureate of the Eighties, reeling off shabbily rousing underdog anthems like “I Will Dare” and “Bastards of Young,” as well as beautifully afflicted songs like “Swinging Party” and “Here Comes a Regular.” A high-school dropout, Westerberg spoke for a nation of smart, wiseacre misfits, paving the way for Green Day and Nirvana, both of which were led by avowed Replacements fans. “Westerberg could be barreling along and do ‘Tommy Gets His Tonsils Out’ or ‘Gary’s Got a Boner,’ and then he could slide into ‘Unsatisfied’ or ‘Sixteen Blue,’ says Craig Finn of the Hold Steady. “So you think this guy was this drunk, punkish dude and all the sudden he’s really sensitive and really vulnerable. Because he’s got you looking both ways, it’s bigger, it hits harder. Or softer, depending on how you look at it.” Westerberg has his own explanation for his unique underdog genius: “I think the opposite when I see something,” he once said. “I have dyslexia, and I’ve used it to its best advantage.”

With a talent for wordplay that can be as head-spinning as it is disturbing, and a knack for incessant sing-song choruses that suggest he might’ve thrived in a Brill Building cubicle, Eminem crams hugely popular songs with more internal rhymes and lyrical trickery than anyone else in contemporary pop. His most recent Number One, “The Monster,” features bonkers couplets like “Straw into gold chump, I will spin/Rumpelstiltskin in a haystack/Maybe I need a straight jacket, face facts.” Like his character in the 2002 biopic 8 Mile, Eminem honed his formidable skills in Detroit rap battles, then polished his rhymes in the studio over springy Dr. Dre tracks that gave him room to freak out as agilely and aggressively as he liked. “Even as a kid, I always wanted the most words to rhyme,” Eminem told Rolling Stone. “Say I saw a word like ‘transcendalistic tendencies.’ I would write it out on a piece of paper and underneath, I’d line a word up with each syllable: ‘and bend all mystic sentence trees.’ Even if it didn’t make sense, that’s the kind of drill I would do to practice.”

Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds rose to fame for his work with Antonio “L.A.” Reid on Bobby Brown’s Don’t Be Cruel, reinforcing taut R&B songwriting with hard hip-hop beats to help create New Jack Swing. But Edmonds’ true legacy is as a craftsman of thoughtful ballads and mid-tempo romantic material, with his own solid career as a performer often overshadowed by the huge successes he’s enabled other artists to enjoy: “End of the Road,” which he wrote for Boyz II Men, broke records with its 13-week run as the Number One song on the Billboard Hot 100. Edmonds has said, “I don’t just come in with songs. I talk with the artist and find out what they will or won’t sing about.” That technique has helped him develop an unrivaled gift for matching a lyric and a mood with a particular singer, especially a particular female singer. It’s hard to imagine anyone but Whitney Houston giving shape to “Exhale (Shoop Shoop),” anyone but Mary J. Blige taking a stand with “Not Gon’ Cry,” anyone but Toni Braxton lending the necessary sultry edge to the many songs he’s written for her over the past quarter-century.

Here Are The 2015 MTV Video Music Award Nominees

Video of the Year

    

Beyoncé — “7/11”
Ed Sheeran — “Thinking Out Loud”
Taylor Swift — “Bad Blood” (ft. Kendrick Lamar)
Mark Ronson — “Uptown Funk” (ft. Bruno Mars)
Kendrick Lamar — “Alright”

Best Male Video

    

Ed Sheeran — “Thinking Out Loud”
Big Sean — “I Don’t Fuck With You”
Nick Jonas — “Chains”
The Weeknd — “Earned It”
Kendrick Lamar — “Alright”

Best Female Video

   

Beyoncé — “7/11”
Taylor Swift — “Blank Space”
Sia — “Elastic Heart”
Ellie Goulding — “Love Me Like You Do”
Nicki Minaj — “Anaconda”

Best Rock Video

    

Hozier — “Take Me to Church”
Fall Out Boy — “Centuries”
Florence and the Machine — “Ship to Wreck”
Walk the Moon — “Shut Up and Dance”
Arctic Monkeys — “Why’d You Only Call Me When You’re High?”

Best Hip-Hop Video

    

Fetty Wap — “Trap Queen”
Nicki Minaj — “Anaconda”
Kendrick Lamar — “Alright”
Wiz Khalifa — “See You Again” (ft. Charlie Puth)
Big Sean — “I Don’t Fuck With You”

Best Pop Video

    

Beyonce — “7/11”
Ed Sheeran — “Thinking Out Loud”
Mark Ronson — “Uptown Funk” (ft. Bruno Mars)
Taylor Swift — “Blank Space”
Maroon 5 — “Sugar”

Best Collaboration

    

Taylor Swift and Kendrick Lamar — “Bad Blood”
Mark Ronson and Bruno Mars — “Uptown Funk”
Wiz Khalifa and Charlie Puth — “See You Again”
Ariana Grande and The Weeknd — “Love Me Harder”
Jessie J, Ariana Grande, and Nicki Minaj — “Bang Bang”

Best Video With a Social Message

    

Jennifer Hudson — “I Still Love You”
Colbie Caillat — “Try”
Big Sean — “One Man Can Change the World”
Rihanna — “American Oxygen”
Wale — “The White Shoes”

Artist to Watch

       

Fetty Wap — “Trap Queen”
Vance Joy — “Riptide”
George Ezra — “Budapest”
James Bay — “Hold Back the River”
FKA Twigs — “Pendulum”

Best Choreography

    

Beyoncé — “7/11”
OK GO — “I Won’t Let You Down”
Chet Faker — “Gold”
Ed Sheeran — “Don’t”
Flying Lotus — “Never Catch Me” (ft. Kendrick Lamar)

Best Art Direction

     

The Chemical Brothers — “Go”
Jack White — “Would You Fight For My Love”
Skrillex & Diplo — “Where Are Ü Now” (ft. Justin Bieber)
Snoop Dogg — “So Many Pros”
Taylor Swift — “Bad Blood” (ft. Kendrick Lamar)

Best Direction

    

Childish Gambino — “Sober”
Hozier — “Take Me to Church”
Kendrick Lamar — “Alright”
Mark Ronson — “Uptown Funk” (ft. Bruno Mars)
Taylor Swift — “Bad Blood” (ft. Kendrick Lamar)

Best Editing

      

A$AP Rocky — “L$D”
Beyonce — “7/11”
Ed Sheeran — “Don’t”
Skrillex & Diplo — “Where Are Ü Now” (ft. Justin Bieber)
Taylor Swift — “Bad Blood” (ft. Kendrick Lamar)

Best Cinematography

    

Alt-J — “Left Hand Free”
Ed Sheeran — “Thinking Out Loud”
FKA Twigs — “Two Weeks”
Flying Lotus — “Never Catch Me” (ft. Kendrick Lamar)
Taylor Swift — “Bad Blood” (ft. Kendrick Lamar)

Best Visual Effects

    

Childish Gambino — “Telegraph Ave”
FKA Twigs — “Two Weeks”
Skrillex & Diplo — “Where Are Ü Now” (ft. Justin Bieber)
Taylor Swift — “Bad Blood” (ft. Kendrick Lamar)
Tyler, The Creator — “Fucking Young/Death Camp”

SoundScan’s 2015 Half-Year Report: Taylor Wins, Strong Streaming Growth Fails to Stop Album Decline

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No doubt remains that it is the year of streaming — the format has come to dominate music consumption in the U.S.

In the first half of 2015 streaming nearly doubled in popularity over last year, generating 135.2 billion streams, up from 70.3 billion streams in the same period last year. (Some of this growth can be attributed to improved data capture, according to Nielsen Music.)

Audio-only listening generated 58.6 billion streams, versus 33.7 billion last year, an increase of 74.2 percent. Audio’s growth was topped by video streams, which accounted for 76.6 billion view-listens, an increase of 109.2 percent from the 36.6 billion streams counted in 2014.

Taylor Swift is ruling the year so far, with 1989 the best-selling album of the first half of 2015 (not to mention topping 2014, too). Last year, 1989 grabbed the top spot with 3.66 million units moved. The album has scanned 1.33 million units so far this year, followed by Drake‘s If You’re Reading This… with 965,000 units. In vinyl sales Swift also reigned, selling 34,000 units. A combined tally of album sales, track downloads and streams leaves Swift, yet again, atop the mountain, totaling 2.011 million album and album equivalent units.

Mark Ronson’s “Uptown Funk!” featuring Bruno Mars is this year’s top-selling single so far, scanning 4.9 million units. Drake’s If You’re Reading This… takes the lead on digital album sales, moving (or transferring, if you prefer) 895,000.

Universal Music Group has improved on its industry lead in market share within album plus track equivalent albums (TEA), growing to 39.2 percent of the total market in the first half of the year.

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